government

All posts tagged government

To Eat Or Not To Eat – That Is The Question

Published October 3, 2011 by glaumland

These passages are from another paper I worked on during my class Trade and Agricultural Health for my Master’s degree. Food safety is a very important topic, as well as a timely one (there is a Listeria outbreak in cantelope from Colorado).

Background on Food Safety

Food safety has been a concern since the advent of ancient civilizations. Although many areas of the world had small populations of hunter-gatherer tribes, a few regions with temperate climates and resources of domesticable livestock and cereal grains found the establishment of agrarian
societies. These early farmers had to develop methods of collection, processing and storage to keep their food wholesome until the next growing season. With the advent of ‘new’ technologies like plowing, fertilizing and irrigation leading to excess food production, these societies moved away from subsistence agriculture to cultures with divisions of labor. Thus this agricultural revolution left some members of society free to be bureaucrats, soldiers, laborers, artisans, innovators and heads of large families.

Excess food production created a need to find methods for food storage and food preservation. After 10,000 BCE, people living in the Fertile Crescent found themselves with an abundance of cereal grains and in response developed technologies needed to keep food edible. That early cultures invented techniques for cooking, preserving and storing food is shown through archaeological evidence as well as writings from ancient civilizations including the Chaldean, Egyptian, Greek and Roman. [1]  Passages from Genesis 12 and 42 inform that while other parts of
the Middle East were experiencing famine, Egypt could be depended upon as a source of grain. Egyptians had developed silos to preserve their crops by keeping the grain cool and dry. Many other inventions and technologies, like pottery, fermentation, and smoking, were developed world-wide as the availability of food increased.

However, these ancient peoples learned that the presence of food did not necessarily lead to good health. After removing wholesome grain from storage, the Egyptians would make flour by
grinding the grain on stones in the open air. This led to a high level of contaminants and particulates in the food, and the Egyptians suffered from excessive tooth wear as well as dental infections and abscesses. [2]  In 500 BC in China, the Confucian Analects gave warnings about
fish, meat and grains that were improperly cooked or kept long enough to spoil. [3]

In more recent times, many developments in food storage and preservation were travel-related, where people needed food that they could carry with them for extended periods of time in different
climates.  Mainly this travel was due to exploration, war or trade. During the Renaissance period, brining became a common method of preserving food and salted food became the main staple of sailors and soldiers.   Nicolas Appert from Paris became the ‘father of canning’ and won a prize from Napoleon who was attempting to expand across Europe and needed a way for his armies to
carry wholesome food with them. [4]

The Spanish-American War lasted for only a few months in 1898, and of the 5642 related deaths, only 379 were due to combat; food poisoning was responsible for ‘thousands of deaths.’ [5, 6]  The US Army bought a 500,000 pound shipment of meat from Armour and Company of Chicago, IL. This meat shipment traveled to and from Liverpool England in 1897 and had been inspected and
stamped by the Bureau of Animal Industry. An army inspector discovered that in the boxes of this meat (which one general referred to as ’embalmed’ meat, having been preserved with nitrate of potash and boric acid and also had food coloring added) many of the tins had burst open and the rotted meat had contaminated the rest of the contents . [7]

Only a few years later, the meat-packing industry suffered a major blow following the release of the book ‘The Jungle’ by Upton Sinclair based on his undercover experiences in the Chicago slaughterhouses. Sinclair’s goal was to expose the corruption of capitalism, and his story was about a fictional immigrant family set in the real world of Chicago and the meat industry with its unsanitary conditions and inhumane treatment of animals and workers alike. ‘The Jungle’ shocked the world with its revelations, and American citizens demanded action from the government.
President Theodore Roosevelt, who was a leader in the progressive movement to reform political corruption and corporate powers, responded by passing the Meat Inspection Act of 1906 and its companion,  the Pure Food & Drug Act. The Meat Inspection Act gave the government jurisdiction over meat-related commerce and applied standards for product inspection and plant sanitation. [8]

Many acts of legislation have been passed and many programs implemented to protect consumers from unsafe food. Perhaps the most important occurred in the 1960’s after the United States
entered the space race. NASA needed a way to provide food for astronauts that was nearly 100% pathogen free, so they turned to the Pillsbury Company, whose researchers worked on that problem plus the complications from providing quality food in situations with zero gravity. Pillsbury realized that their usual quality control programs could not provide the safety requirements; they needed control over the raw materials, environment, production and employees to meet these goals. This multi-step program, the Hazards Analysis and Critical
Control Points System (HACCP), was adopted by the FDA and is now the primary tool used in this country and provides a basis for food safety protocols world-wide. [9, 10]

Despite the progress made in food safety, transportation and storage, there are still many challenges facing the world. With the increase in industrial food production and international shipping, adverse events that used to occur locally (such as food poisonings at church dinners, weddings, etc.) now have the capability to have global effects. The access to nearly instant
internet communication allows any food-related event to be noticed very quickly. Products that are contaminated or potentially dangerous can be swiftly identified and removed from store shelves.

In today’s international food trade, produce and products are shipped world-wide and finally end up in local supermarkets and on the table. Although the importing of fresh and processed food from developed nations should lead to better nutrition and improved health, access to the modern
technologies that support these industries can be limited or cost-prohibitive in developing and least-developed countries. The breakdown of a local food safety system and bureaucratic corruption can prevent wholesome food from getting to the people, and may lead to fighting over limited resources and widespread malnutrition.

Malnutrition can be due to infectious and immunologic disease as well as limited access to food. A 1997 US survey (Morris) found, of the deaths where diarrhea was a contributing factor, that
89% of the victims were children less than 5 years and adults over 55 years of age. [11] Access to more food can be a two-edged sword – the resultant increase in infant and adult survivability means that there is an increase in the numbers of individuals with weak immune systems who
are more likely to propagate or succumb to an insult. The presence of an effective food safety system is necessary to protect all members of society.

International support for developing and least-developed nations is vitally important. Any progress made agriculturally will lead to additional advances in these cultures and countries. Not only will their citizens be healthier, more individuals will have time and resources to invest in other activities, leading to better physical and economic health within these communities. Historically it has been shown that societies that participate in the exchange of agricultural technologies are more likely to become involved in the exchange of other products, opening new markets and new trade
avenues. [12]

Food safety is no longer merely a local concern. Food-borne diseases can potentially threaten the global community, decreasing the health and economic productivity in any region that it touches. As the international organizations address global issues, food safety, especially freedom from
contaminants and pathogens, must be foremost in their goals.

Notes & Resources

1  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_processing

2  http://www.world-foodhistory.com/2008/07/grain-in-egypt-1300-bc.html

3  http://www.enotes.com/food-encyclopedia/food-safety

4  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_processing

5  http://www.food-safety-and-you.com/HistoryofFoodSafety.html

6  http://www.spanamwar.com/casualties.htm#American

7  Zinn, Howard. A people’s
history of the United States: 1492 – present. (New York: HarperCollins Publishers Inc, 2003) 309.
Retrieved from http://books.google.com.

8  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Upton_Sinclair

9  http://www.enotes.com/food-encyclopedia/food-safety

10  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HACCP

11  http://www.enotes.com/food-encyclopedia/food-safety

12  Diamond, Jared. Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies. (New York, Norton, 1997) Kindle location 3305 of 8299.

Advertisements

Look Who Is Crying Over Spilt Milk — Or The Danger Dairy Fairy Tale

Published September 24, 2011 by glaumland

Well, here’s an OMG post for today.

http://hotair.com/archives/2011/02/05/epa-to-regulate-dairy-milk-spills-as-per-oil-spills/

http://www.thecompletepatient.com/storage/WIorder-clarification9-11.pdf

 

Once upon a time, in the land of the free and the home of the brave (and the rest of the world for that matter), there was this amazing substance called ‘milk.’ So magical was this liquid, that it was fed to the babies of many & varied creatures in the animal kingdom known as ‘mammals.’ More wonderful than water, milk was composed of proteins, fats and sugars, vitamins, minerals & water, the basic nutrients needed to keep the infants alive. So important were these nutrients, that female mammals actually had a way to produce and store milk until it was needed by their young. After the babies grew up and were able to find their own food supply, the mothers quit producing this ‘milk’ until it was needed by the next round of offspring. Some mothers produced extra milk, much more than their young ones needed, and these became known as ‘dairy’ animals.

How blessed the mammals felt to have this ‘liquid nutrition.’ Humans, too, recognized the importance of milk. The starry path in the night sky was called The Milky Way. The Promised Land was referred to as the Land of Milk & Honey. Even acts of generosity were recognized as ‘the milk of human kindness.’

The wise people of the kingdom realized how precious this milk was and they looked for different ways to share with others and keep it for future use. They discovered contamination, fermentation, & coagulation, and they called their products ‘cheese,’ ‘buttermilk,’ & ‘cottage cheese.’ Other learned people developed the processes of pasteurization & homogenization to keep the milk safe & creamy. Best of all, a method called ‘refrigeration’ was invented and people learned just how good milk was when chilled or frozen! Some humans would stand in lines at a store to buy this milk, others would pay to have it delivered fresh to their homes.

The people in the kingdom rejoiced. “Happy Cows” (California Milk Advisory Board) were celebrated and Dairy Princesses were appointed. Many dairy lovers would greet each other in the street by saying, “Got Milk?” Meanwhile word spread quickly in the kingdom: “Milk – It Does a Body Good,” (National Dairy Council); “It Builds Bonnie Babies,” (Glaxo Dried Milk); and “Drinka Pinta Milka Day,” (Milk Marketing Board).

But the glory of the dairy days could not last forever. Soon, nannies (those all-knowing dears who only want to do what is in your best interest) complained that this ‘milk’ could be dangerous, so the lords and justices of the kingdom passed legislations and regulations to make the glorious liquid safer for storage and comsumption. And the people of the kingdom rejoiced, although these new rules made the kingdom’s milk more costly and less tasty.

After much study and contemplation, the wisest of the people in the kingdom discovered that these new dairy processes destroyed some of the nutrients in this glorious milk, and the nannies said, “The children need these nutrients that the milk used to have!” So the lords and justices of the kingdom passed more legislations and regulations to add ingredients back into the milk, calling their new product ‘fortified.’ And the people of the kingdom once again rejoiced, even though it required more coins to buy this milk and it tasted even worse than before.

Years passed, and the people of the kingdom still felt blessed by this ‘fortified’ milk (even though it was so bland and costly), and many infants grew into adulthood and then raised their children with this milk. But there were rabble-rousers that began to rumble in the kingdom that they did not want this ‘fortified’ milk from these dairy creatures. So the rousers went to the wise people and instructed them to find a nutritious liquid from other sources. And the wise people, being of course very ingenious, found this liquid and the called it ‘soy milk.’ However, only some of the people in the kingdom rejoiced, as the ‘soy milk’ tasted strange and required them to exchange even more coins.

However, in parts of the kingdom were people who remembered the old ways and honored the dairy mammals. They grumbled at all of the changes that had been made to milk and wanted their glorious milk to come straight from the magical mothers; this milk they called ‘raw.’ And these grumblers went out into the kingdom and gathered these divine dairy creatures to themselves, drinking the ‘raw’ milk without pasteurization and homogenization and fortification. And these people rejoiced and no longer grumbled, for they felt renewed and invigorated by all of the nutrients in their special milk that was so tasty and cost very few coins.

But the nannies, DOING good because only THEY know what IS good, saw these happy people drinking their milk from their dairy animals and exclaimed: “They can’t do that!” The lords stood idly by, worrying about their own lands, jingling the kingdom’s purses and thinking about ways to spend the peoples’ tax monies. The justices agreed with the nannies; ‘raw’ milk was dangerous and the common people must be protected from themselves. So the justices passed new laws stating that people could not drink ‘raw’ milk from their own dairy creatures, nor could they sell their milk to others without complying with the legislations and regulations of the kingdom. And the nannies rejoiced but the grumblers began to grumble once again.

How does this dairy-tale end? If you listen closely, you can hear the grumbling growing louder. But we’ll have to wait and see…

Until next time…

You Be The Judge – Who Is More Effective?

Published September 23, 2011 by glaumland

Happy US Energy’s Solar Decathalon Day! Too bad nobody remembered to order sunshine. The people who visited the competition at the National Mall had to walk around in the rain with umbrellas. I’m sure there is a joke in there somewhere about climate karma, but honestly, with a price tag at $100,000 per team (19 this year) I don’t know what there is to laugh about.

The first thing I noticed http://www.weeklystandard.com/blogs/solar-decathlons-rainy-start_594112.html was that the price tag of the model shown came in at about $450-500,000. The goal is to create an energy efficient home, but at this rate nobody could afford one. That’s a great example of government INefficiency.

Now here are some examples of homes that entrepreneurs are developing to help create affordable housing: http://www.tumbleweedhouses.com/openhouse/  &  http://www.thetinylife.com/what-is-the-tiny-house-movement/ . Cute, affordable, and energy efficient.

OK, so we’ve paid nearly $200K for 19 government-sponsored homes, when we could have gotten 100 tiny homes from private industry. Remind me again, why the government isn’t good at this game?

Until next time…

It’s Not Twin Peaks…

Published June 2, 2011 by glaumland

Thank you Ace for the best and funniest thing I have read today.

He looks guilty because he’s guilty.

He acts guilty because he’s guilty.

He talks guilty because he’s guilty.

He doesn’t call the cops on the hackers because he’s guilty.

He calls the cops on reporters because he’s guilty.

He doesn’t deny the picture is his because he’s guilty.

This is not complicated. This is not Twin Peaks.

This whole “Weinergate” thing is sooo funny. And so sad.

Funny, well because the poor guy has a name that just begs for laughs. You know, like the Oscar Mayer ‘weiner song’:

Oh, I wish I was an Oscar Mayer weiner,

That is what I truly want to be,

‘Cause if I was an Oscar Mayer weiner

Everyone would be in love with me!

See, I think poor Anthony took that song to heart and really thinks that everyone wants to be with him. Or at least his twitter pal. Especially if you’re young and hot. And you think he’s hot. Add in the big (R) after my name and that leaves me out on all counts.

But the sad part is what his wife must be feeling. At least I hope she’s feeling something. Because if she doesn’t come out and say anything, I’ll come to the conclusion that she’s alot like Hillary and stickin’ to her man for the money and fame and power. IMHO.

Also sad that folks just can’t man up and admit when they’ve screwed up. (OK, this sentence could be read sooo many different ways!) The guilty who admit they are guilty look a lot less guilty than those who try to convince you they’re not guilty. Don’tcha think?

Thanks, Ace, for the clarity. The funniest part is I was watching a youtube video of Twin Peaks Lego’s just the other night and have had Twin Peaks memories going through my head.

It isn’t Twin Peaks.

Until next time…

The Hypocrisy Of It All – First Amendment & Separation Of Church & State

Published June 2, 2011 by glaumland

The ACLU, the Americans United for Separation of Church and State, and this federal judge

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/06/02/prayer-prohibited-at-graduation-ceremony/?test=latestnews

want to keep all traces of ‘public prayer’ out of a TX high school graduation ceremony. However, kindly, the judge did allow that students could wear religious clothing or kneel towards Mecca.

Really, I say. Really?

Most parents and educators I know would be much more concerned that students dress appropriately (wearing nice clothes and none of the flip-flops or pants-on-the-ground) and act respectfully (not disrupting the service_oops! did I call it that?_ by getting out of their chairs and moving around) than that people would say a quiet “Bow your heads…” or “amen.” Two things really struck me about this article.

First, how about we have some folks dress up in religious habits or arab garb, then come into Judge Biery’s courtroom. Then, whenever they like, they can get out of their seats and assemble in the aisles, kneeling on their knees towards Rome or bowing towards Mecca. I bet he wouldn’t stand for that disruption in his courtroom, but he says it’s OK for a graduation. HYPOCRITE!

Secondly, if it is true that there is entirely separation of church and state, then it seems to me that Judge Biery has no right to tell a school how they should hold their graduation ceremony. That is a private matter for the school officials and the parents to decide. I don’t care if the school does receive federal dollars, separation should work both ways. Unless there is an obvious physical danger (like yelling ‘fire’ at the movies) anything said at that graduation shouldn’t matter to anyone outside of the auditorium. The school should be able to conduct their ceremony as they deem appropriate, and for Judge Biery to rule otherwise actually creates a relationship between church and state. HYPOCRITE! (Just to add to this point, I really do think the US government should get out of Education and turn it back over to the local governments.)

I’m not entirely certain how the Schultz family can claim that they would “suffer irreparable harm” if someone prays. Maybe it’s like spontaneous combustion or something. My advice to the Schultz’s: don’t pray, don’t go, or get over it. As this is being read, I’m sure prayers are already going up to Heaven on their behalf. Better keep the extinguisher handy!

Hypocrisy is claiming that there is separation between church and state, and then the state tries to assert control over the church. The First Amendment really prohibits the government from establishing a state-sponsored church (like Uncle Sam’s Church of Democracy). As Thomas Jefferson said, the separation is to put a wall between church and state, but it doesn’t mean that you can’t see over that wall or shake hands over it. Good fences (and walls) make good neighbors. And if you don’t like what your neighbor is saying, then leave. Or put your fingers in your ears. Or hum. Or talk louder.

It’s time for Americans to do some studying and read our Constitution for themselves. If you don’t agree with it, you’ve got that right, and the First Amendment protects your right to vocally disagree. But it doesn’t give you the right to be offended by what you see or hear. Get over it, or get out of here.

Until next time…

Hamburgers Don’t Grow On Trees

Published February 20, 2011 by glaumland

Little Boy was enjoying a hamburger the other day. Looking at the seeds on top of the bun, he suggested that we plant them so we could have a tree with all of the hamburgers we want. My two thoughts…how cute, and I wish.

We were driving for a while on the road to go see family, so we went thru a drive-thru restaurant. We don’t usually indulge, but Little Boy is going thru a growth spurt and is constantly hungry these days. And when you’re a little boy and hungry, there isn’t time to wait.

Luckily, there are lots of items on the dollar menu to choose from. Good thing, because that’s about all we can afford these days. It seems between the gasoline, the groceries and the electric bill, my checking account is running low earlier in the month than usual. We’re watching for sales a lot more closely, as well as stocking up on generic food and lots of potatoes and rice to stretch meals out.

The government may say the economy is doing better, but I disagree. I still know too many people without jobs. The price of everything is going up. Even the feed for the critters is going up, which means it is costing us more to feed ourselves. And as long as there is no extra money to spend, there is no recovery. Economics for Dummies, legislators need not apply.

I wish hamburgers grew on trees. I know how to grow trees.

Until next time…

The FreeDumm-ies Of The Press

Published January 26, 2011 by glaumland

It’s been a while since I have read Animal Farm by George Orwell. It’s an amazing story and one that should be required reading for all (I know, that isn’t exactly freedom).

But perhaps as important as the story is the preface that was not printed with most editions of the book. How telling is that? Here’s an excerpt, thanks to Wikipedia:

“The sinister fact about literary censorship in England is that it is largely voluntary. … Things are kept right out of the British press, not because the Government intervenes but because of a general tacit agreement that ‘it wouldn’t do’ to mention that particular fact.”

Now replace ‘England’ with ‘United States’ and ‘British’ with ‘American.’ Unfortunately, Orwell’s observation about the Brits during WWII is just as accurate about the Mainstream Media today. Whether the story (or absence of one) is about the economy, sharia, Obama-care, Sarah Palin, climate-change, abortion or many other topics, the MSM is out to promote their agenda, not to report facts. Just look at the TV line-ups and you see how much time is devoted to ‘opinion journalism’ from left and right. Where it used to be that an opinion of a publication was delivered on the editorial page, these days it seems that most journalists feel that it is their opinion of events, and not the facts, that are important.

Now I see a report that PBS Newshour is the most trusted source of news. Yeah, right. Personally, I figure since my tax dollars pay to keep Public Television on the air, it is good to keep an eye and ear on them. Imagine my surprise (silly me, I actually was!) that there was no coverage of the grand jury indictment handed down against Kermit Gosnell of the Philadelphia Women’s Medical Society. It is a big story, and bound to bring the issue of abortion to the national forefront. But I guess PBS isn’t interested. Not even a whisper on their show or website. And according to Brent Bozell over at Townhall.com, ” “CBS Evening News” had one story, NBC’s “Today” “offered 50 vague words and ABC couldn’t be bothered. Rachel Maddow anchored an entire hour-long special on the shooting death of abortionist George Tiller, but a Nexis search finds no one on MSNBC could even whisper the name of Kermit Gosnell. (CNN and Fox News each followed the story for a few days.)” Is that journalism?

Specifically, my take on the Gosnell story is that it isn’t even right to call this man a ‘doctor’ as physicians take an oath ‘to do no harm.’ How he got away butchering babies and women for decades is something I don’t understand. Here’s another quote: 

Associated Press reported, “Prosecutors described the clinic as a ‘house of horrors’ where Gosnell kept baby body parts on the shelves, allowed a 15-year-old high school student to perform intravenous anesthesia on patients and had his licensed cosmetologist wife do late-term abortions.”

 I’m not a proponent of medical lawsuits, but I think that the administrators for the Pennsylvania Department of State, Pennsylvania Dept. of Health, and the Philadelphis Health Dept. should be liable for damages. In whopping big amounts. Maybe there should be some convictions of public officials, as well. Hopefully the PA attorney general pushes this until the very end, not only convicting the people who did wrong, but also putting the fear of God into others who might think this is acceptable behavior. Read this post from Michelle Malkin for more horrific abortion scandals: http://michellemalkin.com/2011/01/26/beyond-the-philadelphia-horror/. The press better wake up soon because this is set to explode into a major national controversy.

I don’t believe abortion is right and I don’t believe it is a right. I was ambivalent about this issue when I was younger, thinking everyone should decide for themselves. However, my views were crystallized when we lost our first child at 14 weeks of pregnancy. The OB-GYN didn’t even realize the baby was gone, and a nurse talked about our ‘spontaneous abortion.’ That’s the medical term for miscarriage, but it is too many letters to write in a chart, so the abbreviation ‘SAB’ is used instead. To be told I had aborted my child, even with the qualifier of ‘spontaneous,’ was too much. Unfortunately, we lost that baby and two others. And I began to realize exactly how precious life is, especially those little lives. To some they may be ‘fetal tissue’ or a ‘cluster of cells’, but to me they are a miracle of creation, genetically unique from all other life.

But back to the main issue of this blog, which it the freedom of the press NOT to report news. When did it happen that journalists elevated themselves & determined that they should give us the stories that are important to them? Why do they think that their opinions are of any interest to us? Where do they get off preaching to us? How will this end?

Huh, isn’t that funny. I just asked the most important questions in journalism: Who, What, Where, When & How. And that’s all I ask; give me the facts and let me decide for myself what the news means to me.

By the way, here’s some other news that hasn’t made the news:

Staff Sargeant Patrick Zeigler was shot in the head 4 times by Major Hasan during the Fort Hood shooting (more aptly termed Act of War or Act of Terrorism, but you won’t see that in the MSM). Sargeant Zeigler has endured multiple surgeries to repair his head wounds, and has made tremendous strides in his recovery. His fiance and now wife Jessica has charted their journey at http://patrickjessica.blogspot.com/. Why is it that we’ve gotten moment-by-moment updates on Congresswoman Giffords but hardly any reports about the victims of Ft. Hood? Because it fits the message of the journalists.

Christians are being slaughtered by the scores in “moderate, peaceful” Middle East countries. (Oh, and let’s not forget Russia or China as well) Here’s a recent article in Big Peace: http://bigpeace.com/ipt/2011/01/16/the-middle-east-christian-onslaught/. I see that Al Qaeda is not only posting plans for making bombs on their websites, but now, for the sake of convenience  I’m certain, they are also posting the locations of Christian churches. Sure, I know that Islam is a peaceful religion. Sure, I know that I can’t use words like ‘terrorist’ or ‘extremist’ or ‘crusade’ because I might offend someone. Sure, I know that it isn’t right to profile people who prefer Arab dress. How do I know all of these things? Not because I decided they were true, but because the MSM told me so!

Lee Stranahan @ http://leestranahan.com/ has been doing extensive work on the Pigford Fraud. It looks as though our tax money that was set aside to compensate black farmers for discrimination has been wasted through excessive attorney fees and payments to people who aren’t (or weren’t) farmers. Lee interviewed two gentlemen that had aired their frustrations with this situation to Georgia Congressman Sanford Bishop (yeah, THAT Sanford Bishop, of the Congressional Black Caucus). In response, depending on the time of day and who he was talking to, Bishop reported that a) sure there was fraud but policing it wasn’t in his job description, b) he’s surprised to hear about any fraud and those gentlemen must surely be doing too much drinking, and c) sure there was fraud and that is why the legislation had anti-fraud provisions, and oh by the way, those gentlemen are just disgruntled. What a load of PIGCRAP from a man elected by Americans and paid by Americans to be in service to America. So what does the MSM have to say about this? (…Crickets…)

Ok, this turned into a really long post and rant. But my overall message is this…get out on the web and look at lots of news sites and really find out the stories that should be in the news. Take your opinions and your thoughts back from the MSM journalist and make up your own mind. It’s time we all started thinking and talking. Evil can’t survive in the sunlight.

Until next time…